Some clothing

A Closer Look

Mary’s boiled laundry likely consisted of things made of white cotton, like the long “drawers,” or underwear, people wore at the time. Clothes were made so that parts that were most likely to get dirty, like collars and sleeves, could be removed and washed separately.

Woman wearing a ca. 1860s-style dress. Note white collar and sleeves.

Woman wearing a ca. 1860s-style dress. Note white collar and sleeves.
Carte-de-visite 1860-1869. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society Photograph Collection, .

 

Big or heavy clothing, or clothing made of fabrics such as wool, (like dresses, pants or jackets), would be aired and brushed, but rarely washed in water. Women were expected to know how to do laundry and how to use a variety of substances to remove stains. For more information on the clothing worn by men, women and children in about 1860, visit the Memorial Hall Museum of Deerfield, Massachussetts online (http://www.memorialhall.mass.edu/activities/dressup/index.html).

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Alexander Faribault

Beaver
Buffalo
Children
Farming
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Fur Trade
Making the Town Grow
Request
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Translated

Mary Whipple

Bed Bugs
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Emma and Eva Havens
Emma Willard School
Eva's Death
Hastings to Faribault
Hawaiian Fever
Learning
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Letter of August 25, 1862
Longed to Travel
Mary's Wedding
Muhlenberg
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Soap to Sausages
Some Clothing
Sound of Bells

Taopi

Baptism
Big Woods
Fort Snelling
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When it Started

Henry Whipple

Back Home
Bad Teeth
Bashaw
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Enmegahbowh
Frozen
Gull Lake
Loved to Fish
Six Children
Time of Crisis
Treatment of Indians
Underwear
Youngest Child


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